Week in Review: Fired New Beginnings ‘whistleblower’ asks board to rehire him

Fired New Beginnings ‘whistleblower’ asks board to rehire him
A former New Beginnings Schools Foundation employee who raised a red flag on what he said are suspicious grade changes at John F. Kennedy High School asked for his job back at a special meeting of the charter school network’s governing board Thursday night. Runell King hired employment lawyer Dorothy Tarver this week.

Week in Review: After Lens and WWL-TV investigations, charter school network CEO suspended

At an emergency meeting Monday night, the New Beginnings Schools Foundation board placed CEO Michelle Blouin-Williams on paid leave pending the outcome of an independent investigation into allegations of grade inflation and falsifying public documents related to a bus contract. The three-school charter network’s board voted unanimously to hire the law firm Adams and Reese to conduct the investigation.

Week in Review: How have the City Council’s utility consultants kept their contracts for so long?

In 1985, New Orleans residents decided that New Orleans Public Service Inc. — now called Entergy New Orleans — should be regulated by the City Council rather than the state’s Public Service Commission, which had overseen the utility for the three previous years. Ever since, the council has relied almost entirely on a group of outside consultants to fulfill that authority.

Week in Review: The final year in a closing school

Class Dismissed: The final year in a closing school
On a Friday afternoon in January, a few parents and two ministers gathered at Medard Nelson Charter School at the corner of St. Bernard Avenue and Gentilly Boulevard hoping there was something they could do to keep the school open past May.

Week in Review: Civil rights lawsuit over fake subpoenas, witness arrests allowed to go forward, judge rules

Civil rights lawsuit over fake subpoenas, witness arrests allowed to go forward, judge rules
A federal lawsuit against Orleans Parish District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro and several of his prosecutors — alleging that they violated people’s civil rights through the use of fake subpoenas and unlawfully obtained arrest warrants against witnesses and crime victims — will be allowed to go forward. Calling the use of fake subpoenas cited in the lawsuit an allegation of “systematic fraud,” federal Judge Jane Triche Milazzo on Thursday issued a ruling that rejected much of Cannizzaro’s request that the case be dismissed.