A look at a disappearing daily ritual for many

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Gail Brooks takes in the day's news while Wilbert "Mr. Chill" Wilson cuts her hair at the shop bearing his nickname on South Carrollton Avenue. Wilson said he owes his success to the paper, which has featured community events held at his shop. For instance, the paper wrote a feature story in 2010 when Mayor Mitch Landrieu and others came to the barber shop to teach young men how to tie a tie and pass on other tips from generation to generation.

With The Times-Picayune set to reduce its print schedule to three days a week, The Lens took a look at readers’ rituals on Monday and Tuesday, two of the days that the paper will drop sometime in the fall.

Photographer Bevil Knapp set out across the metro area this week and provides this photo essay of scenes that will soon be a thing of the past early in the week. Click any image to enlarge, and then scroll through the images in the larger format.

 

Gail Brooks takes in the day's news while Wilbert "Mr. Chill" Wilson cuts her hair at the shop bearing his nickname on South Carrollton Avenue. Wilson said he owes his success to the paper, which has featured community events held at his shop. For instance, the paper wrote a feature story in 2010 when Mayor Mitch Landrieu and others came to the barber shop to teach young men how to tie a tie and pass on other tips from generation to generation.

 

Wilson catches up on sports while waiting for his next customer.

 

The Rev. Msgr. Crosby W. Kern enjoys his daily paper at the rectory of the St. Louis Cathedral Tuesday. He said his 90-year-old mother will no longer be able to read her daily paper. He said he believes that an informed community is the core of our freedom: When information is hard to get, the less we think and the fewer our freedoms.

 

Patients Paul DeBrock (left) and high school senior Bryce Laird read the paper while iced up for therapy at Fairway Medical Physical Therapy in Covington.

 

Dwayne Collins reads the paper daily during his bus commute to work in New Orleans.

 

From left to right, John Desplas, Nick Crowell, Mark Herman, Sharon Morrow and Joe Mole have been meeting for 20 years at the Fair Grinds Coffee Shop to read their daily copy of The Times-Picayune, work the crossword puzzle and talk about New Orleans.

 

Starting sometime this fall, the daily newspaper rack at Lakeside Newsstand in Metairie will have a hole in it four days a week.

 

Nick George mans the FOX8 news desk, which regularly monitors a variety of news sources, including The Times-Picayune.

 

Corey Fouchi enjoys his daily Times-Picayune at Morning Call Coffee Stand in Metairie on Tuesday morning.

 

Dave Glaviano, a former paperboy, reads his daily paper every morning at Morning Call.

 

Glaviano has kept the notice he dropped with subscribers when he took over his paper route.

 

 

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