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Coastal restoration concerns mount; Jindal struggles to save voucher program

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The Louisiana Supreme Court on Tuesday declared that the way the Jindal administration has been financing a statewide school voucher program is unconstitutional, a decision that has significant ramifications for the ongoing state budget debate and the approximately 8,000 students who have been promised voucher seats for the fall. Furthermore, the court nullified the way the Legislature authorized roughly $3.4 billion in student funding for this school year, creating a huge headache for lawmakers who now have to find a way to legally authorize money that has largely been spent. The high court, however, did not strike down the legislation authorizing vouchers, and  left the door open for the administration to use other public funds to pay for the program.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.