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Secret memos show brazenness of Big Oil; teacher bonus pay a bust

Sharp increases in federal flood insurance rates are distressing coastal homeowners from Hawaii to New England and are starting to hurt property values and housing sales in areas just beginning to recover from the recession, according to residents and legislators.

The only way the Public Records Law will have the meaning it was intended is when the leges get the political courage to hold the agency heads personally liable for the failure to comply with legitimate records requests. All costs incurred by a citizen in securing a record, after being denied, should be reimbursed to the citizen by automatically deducting it from the agency head’s paychecks.

Last week, The Lens wrote about compliance with a new legislative resolution calling on agencies to identify whom people should contact with their requests.

Jefferson led the state in 2012 with 22 deaths, according to preliminary state Vital Statistics data, followed by St. Tammany with 11 and Orleans with six.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.