What We're Reading

Scientists rebut criticism that sediment diversions harm marshland; council approves food-truck law


Three key Louisiana coastal scientists on Wednesday rebutted growing criticism by some oyster growers and commercial fishers that state plans to build major diversions of Mississippi River sediment and freshwater to restore coastal wetlands could instead speed the disappearance of saltwater wetlands.

The criticisms from the oyster growers and commercial fishers— that river water is over-enriched with nutrients from fertilizer runoff, which weakens marsh vegetation — are similar to those made by scientists in this report by Bob Marshall. Coastal czar Garret Graves favors the science that supports the diversions, and told NOLA.com, “We’re moving forward with the master plan.”

New Orleans City Council passed a revised food truck ordinance that would increase the availability of permits and allow more trucks in New Orleans. …

Council members argued over several last-minute amendments to the proposed ordinance, including two concerning bathrooms. 

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.