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NOPD looking into slow response times; Jindal’s proposal raises sales tax even more

At a hastily scheduled City Council presentation that itself may have been slightly less than a legal gathering under state open meetings law, Mayor Mitch Landrieu told the council that the sheriff’s consent decree would cost the city $22 million a year for five years.

Sheriff Marlin Gusman said soon after that he had no idea how the mayor came up with that that figure.

After touring the Poverty Point State Historic Site this week, and seeing firsthand the erosion caused by Harlin Bayou, Louisiana Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne has requested an Interim Emergency Board meeting to address the problems there. … [According to Dardenne:] “It is crucial that we are proactive in protecting this incredible prehistoric site from erosion.” 

Poverty Point was one of the largest known pre-historic cities in North America, and has been nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Historic site.

The chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure said Thursday there’s a good chance that the Water Resources and Development Act will make it out of Congress this year, but was noncommittal about whether key Louisiana projects, including transferring the cost of operating and maintaining gates in the Lake Borgne Surge Barrier to the Army Corps of Engineers, would be included.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.