What We're Reading

Neighborhood rumblings cue renewed work on noise regs; BP frozen out

A new report on noise levels in New Orleans neighborhoods that concluded the city’s enforcement mechanisms are inadequate seems to have effectively restarted the process of writing a new sound ordinance.

The Orleans Parish sheriff will no longer honor many requests from the federal immigration authorities to detain people who are suspected of being here illegally, making New Orleans one of a growing number of jurisdictions to adopt such a policy and the first to do so in the Deep South.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced new federal sentencing guidelines that would decrease punishments for low-level drug offenders. Metropolitan Crime Commission President Rafael Goyeneche comments: “You’re seeing the federal government move in a direction that many states have already begun to explore, recognizing that the cost of corrections is crushing the states.”

Not only did the City of New Orleans spend $9.3 million more in 2012 than it collected that year, but it also had major holes in the way it tracked $240 million in federal grants, according to a series of annual independent audits released Monday. …

The overspending of the city’s $529 million general fund in particular is likely to come into sharp focus as Landrieu and the City Council hammer out the government’s 2014 spending plan this fall.

Louisiana’s higher education leaders need to devise a plan on how to better fund the state’s public universities, House Speaker Chuck Kleckley said Monday. The Lake Charles Republican said while lawmakers can be involved in the discussion, the ultimate plan should be one drawn up by education leaders and presented to the state Legislature for approval.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.