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Jindal sounds off; Mary Landrieu hangs tough; dying ‘Angola 3’ lifer released

A proposed overhaul of the city’s comprehensive zoning ordinance was met with some dissatisfaction Tuesday night from residents of eastern New Orleans, who expressed fear that the new rules still will do little to stop the proliferation of “dollar stores” and multifamily residential developments in their neighborhoods.

The state Democratic Party called Common Core implementation a “train wreck” last week, with teachers given not enough time and not enough guidance.

White considered that empowering. He said Tuesday that the “most disabling condition in public education is not incompetence but learned passivity,” limiting the flow of good ideas.

Among the hundreds of new laws taking effect Tuesday (Oct. 1) is one meant to help the Chesapeake Bay by limiting when, where and how Marylanders should feed their lawns. One scientist, though, suggests homeowners could help the bay better by forgoing lawn fertilizer altogether.… Maryland agriculture officials pushed the measure as a matter of equity, saying homeowners needed to join farmers in cutting back on fertilizer use to help the bay, since turf grass covers almost as much land now as do farm crops.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.