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Feds decry councilwoman’s tweaks to moonlighting rules; BP back on the hook

Louisiana’s sharp divergence from the tax revenue trend in other states raises a question: whether Jindal’s economic policies — which favor lower taxes, less government spending and tax breaks for companies willing to invest in the state — are lifting Louisiana up, as the governor frequently claims.

Under RTA’s plan pedestrians who now ride the ferries for free would pay a base fare of $2 each way or $75 for a monthly pass. That’s a significant cost for many who use the boats daily, residents said.

“We’re ready to pay, but we want a reasonable fee,” Karen Smoyer said.

The New Orleans City Council chamber was packed Wednesday afternoon with more than 100 people who thought the seemingly never-ending saga of Habana Outpost might finally be coming to an end… . They were wrong.

As recently as 2010, Jefferson had 18 failing schools. The latest list includes just four, with only one of them — Woodmere Elementary in Harvey — being a conventional school. The other three are alternative schools, where students who misbehave in their regular school are sent for a few months.

… Of the 18 failing schools from 2010, the school board has closed or combined seven.

“In rapid succession over the next seven days, the levee board will make its case to the Association of Levee Boards of Louisiana and a joint meeting of the state House and Senate transportation, highways and public works committees.” Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority East vice president John Barry says he is “happy to have any opportunity to explain” lawsuits filed by his board.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.