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BP settlement unlikely before judge rules; dumpster fees ignored; CIA picks Bossier

Senate Bill 79 by Sen. Robert Adley, R-Benton, would give the governor the ability to reject nominees to the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authorities on both the east and west banks and would require the nominating committee that chooses those nominees to send him a wider field for approval.

Legal experts have said it appears unlikely BP and the U.S. government will settle the multibillion-dollar dispute before U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier begins issuing a series of rulings connected to two earlier phases in the trial. … Those rulings will trigger the penalty phase, in which Barbier must decide on another series of questions to set BP’s fines under the Clean Water Act. The fines could cost BP up to $18 billion.

Work-release programs are meant to give inmates near the end of their incarceration a chance to earn money and learn skills at private jobs — while reducing recidivism by increasing the chances that inmates will adjust to life outside jail. But the programs can also be a business opportunity for their operators. In St. Tammany Parish, the two work-release programs are privately run by people with ties to St. Tammany Parish Sheriff Jack Strain. Marlin Peachey, one of the owners of Northshore Workforce Solutions, is Strain’s campaign treasurer and former warden of the jail.



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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.