What We're Reading

WTC tower to remain; ACT scores plunge; BP giving up on local court fight?

BP’s increasingly bad-tempered spat with the U.S. federal court, claims administrators and the legal community in New Orleans over oil-spill compensation payments suggests the company has given up trying to win the case locally.

Instead, BP seems to be focused on getting it before a regional or national tribunal as quickly as possible in the hope of a more sympathetic hearing.

Illinois is outsourcing part of its Medicaid program to a company that is under a federal grand jury investigation in Louisiana, was disqualified from bidding in Arkansas, was ushered out of Maine and has been the subject of complaints in Utah.

The black marks against the company, including its firing in Louisiana in March, haven’t deterred Illinois officials, who say they are confident of their recently announced plan to use the company’s services through a partnership with Michigan.

It makes no sense for a board that might be replaced in the next few months to select a new executive director. Its action could saddle a new board with a leader that it would not have chosen and deprive that board of a key opportunity to shape the S&WB’s future. In addition, since the executive director serves at the pleasure of the board, premature action could also discourage qualified individuals from coming forward.

After a ceremonial groundbreaking in April, Delgado Community College has started construction on a replacement for the former Sidney Collier Technical College campus in eastern New Orleans.

The site has been closed since Hurricane Katrina floodwaters caused significant damage in August 2005. 

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.