What We're Reading

U.S. system for chemical storage oversight is flawed; LA Swift done in by class prejudice?

Louisiana’s health chief is looking for ways to trim the 10,000-person waiting list for a program that provides in-home services to the developmentally disabled, including prioritizing the list to ensure those with the most dire needs get help first.

[Bus] riders are apparently something of an afterthought among the powers that be, which gets to the real problem with LA Swift: It was a bus, and there exists in this country an inherent class prejudice against riding buses—particularly in the Deep South, where middle-class and wealthy people are wedded to their cars.

Because they are publicly financed, charter schools are required to teach secular, state-approved curriculums. When founded by a faith-based organization, they are also required to operate under a separate nonprofit entity. Because charter schools do not receive facilities financing from the state, a leasing agreement with a church, whose grounds often stand empty during weekdays, can be a cost-efficient arrangement for both parties.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.