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Ruling affirmed: OPSB mass firings were illegal; Vitter bats zero; private forests fall

Landrieu has worked hard to move the city forward. But he has displayed little patience for those who aren’t on the team. While jovial and gregarious in public, he often lacerates and retaliates against those who question that one voice — his.

The Lens interviewed more than 30 New Orleans residents who said that the mayor mistreated or punished them after they expressed a contrary view, or that they had firsthand knowledge of the mayor’s heavy-handed behavior. They include current and former elected officials, business people, a wide range of civic activists, attorneys and an opponent in the 2010 mayoral race.

Some of them say the mayor withheld funding or cut off city contracts. Others say he forced them from city boards or jobs. Still others say he chastised them with curse words over the phone or accosted them in public.

A public servant has pleaded guilty in federal court to theft charges stemming from a series of FOX 8 reports. She’ll be sentenced by a federal judge next month.

For six months of work, taxpayers paid Schwann Sumas of New Orleans $70,000 – but our 2011 investigation showed she did little work for that pay.

Rep. Steve Scalise had one “hit” in four at bats for a batting average of .250. Cedric Richmond had zero hits in nine at-bats. U.S. Sen Mary Landrieu had six hits in 27 at-bats. Meanwhile, U.S. Sen David Vitter — despite having 61 at-bats, the most of any senator, was hitless.

“It’s ludicrous that we’re chopping down our forests and shipping them to Europe to help meet their energy goals,” said Scot Quaranda, the campaign director for the Dogwood Alliance, a forest watchdog group. “But in the South, on private land, you can basically get away with anything.” 

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.