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Cops on camera; Jindal floats health care ideas; barrier islands to be drilled?

[Algiers Charter Schools Association CEO Adrian] Morgan expects to know the result of each application between June and July. The new schools would open for the 2015-16 school year. He said the organization considered many areas in Louisiana but chose the Shreveport and Baton Rouge areas because they are the two largest metropolitan areas in the state after New Orleans.

Superintendent Ronal Serpas touted the technology Wednesday as “the next step in American policing to ensure transparency and accountability,” saying the devices would remove the “he said, she said” from everyday police work.

At the heart of the debate is $40 million worth of planning and design for projects that would divert sediment from the Mississippi River at strategic points using massive pipelines to dump it into the wetlands to mimic the process that creates marshland.

Commercial fishermen contend the projects would actually alter delicate salinity of the marshes, which would in turn damage surrounding habitats.

[S]tate lawmakers are considering a bill that will give the city more enforcement power on nuisance, overgrown lots, and blight.

The proposed bill would also allow the city of New Orleans to pass along the clean-up tab to the owner of the blighted property.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.