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‘No Orleans’ by 2100?; Jindal tax swap a smart-ALEC move; Mid-City Whole Foods

“The Dutch, with a knowledge of water, tides and floods honed by painful experience, can calculate to the centimeter — and the Dutch government legislates accordingly — exactly how high or low to position hundreds of dikes along rivers and other waterways to anticipate storms they estimate will occur once every 25 years, or every 1,000 years, or every 10,000. And now the evidence is leading them to undertake what may seem, at first blush, a counterintuitive approach: The Dutch are starting to let the water in. They are contriving to live with nature, rather than fight (what will inevitably be, they have come to realize) a losing battle. “

New Orleans has been selected to receive technical assistance to explore the potential of establishing a bike sharing program. Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the program yesterday. Bike sharing programs are designed to provide free or affordable access to bicycles for short trips in an urban area as an alternative to motorized public transit or private vehicles.

The city and Bike Easy sponsored a demonstration bicycle-sharing in the days leading up to the Super Bowl.

Gov. Robert Bentley, a Republican, has called for a $12.5 million increase — or more than 60 percent — in the state’s preschool budget, with the eventual goal of increasing financing over 10 years to the point where every 4-year-old in the state could have a preschool slot. The governor’s proposal is supported by a coalition of early-education advocates and business leaders, who see preschool as an important component of future job readiness. 

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.