What We're Reading
 

New York Times weaves together mayoral election and Nagin trial; Group wants to bring Jazzland back

 Government & Politics

A couple of weeks ago, U.S. Senate candidate Rob Maness told a room of Baton Rouge Republicans that racism and prejudice was pretty much over.

“I believe our society is very close to becoming color blind,” Maness told the overwhelmingly white audience. …

On the other side of that equation, says Southern University Professor Albert Samuels, many African-Americans are just as impatient that some whites don’t acknowledge racism despite what they see as overwhelming evidence.

[Gov. Bobby] Jindal’s rejection of the committee’s nominations of Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East President Tim Doody and retired Judge David Gorbaty for the seat is the first time an administration has sent back recommendations from the nominating committee in its seven-year history. It has raised questions about whether allowing the governor to reject the nominations of an independent board could undermine what was intended to be a nonpolitical process.

The new classroom rules, which are set to take full effect this fall, are expected to spark dozens of bills in the session that begins March 10, including efforts to end state participation in the more challenging reading, writing and math goals.

[New Orleans City Council candidate Eugene Green] planned to open a Cold Stone Creamery ice cream shop in the 900 block of Decatur Street, a block away from Cafe Du Monde. The property is owned by the French Market Corporation, the city agency that oversees the French Market and a handful of other city-owned properties in the French Quarter.

Help us report this story     Report an error    
The Lens' donors and partners may be mentioned or have a stake in the stories we cover.
About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.