What We're Reading
 

Local battle brewing against Air B&B; judge’s real message in Zeitoun ruling

The Louisiana Senate Tuesday (May 20) approved the House-amended version of legislation restricting so-called “legacy lawsuits” filed against oil and gas companies to get them to clean up oilfield waste pits and restore damaged property or pay damages.

It’s impossible to know what natural disasters will do to buried contaminants, [State University of New York medical professor Robert] Kanter said. After hurricanes Rita and Katrina, soil lead levels declined in 63 percent of census tracts in New Orleans. Apparently, floods carried away the contaminants.

But we can’t count on natural disasters always carrying toxics away, Kanter said.

If lawmakers are going to do everything in their power to restrict the availability of abortion services — and Louisiana lawmakers are in the process of doing just that by overwhelmingly backing a bill that purports to protect women but in reality limits their access to a constitutionally protected procedure — the least they can do is confront the problem of unwanted pregnancy on the front end.

Help us report this story     Report an error    
The Lens' donors and partners may be mentioned or have a stake in the stories we cover.
About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.