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Jindal drains trust funds; Core seen as boon to minorities; LGBT bills readied

The Republican governor has steered tobacco settlement dollars away from health and education trust funds and into the annual operating budget; zeroed out a list of funds that had dedicated fees and other balances planned for specific projects or purposes; and drained an elderly trust fund that once contained more than $830 million.

The upcoming session of the Louisiana Legislature could very well bring the strongest LGBT agenda the state has ever seen. Bills have already been filed or will soon be introduced to usher in new anti-discrimination laws protecting gays and lesbians from discrimination, reversing the state’s bans against sodomy, adding new protections for bullying in schools and erasing perceived biases in housing.

Cities that have worked for years to attract young professionals who might have once moved to the suburbs are now experimenting with ways to protect a group long deemed expendable — working- and lower-middle-class homeowners threatened by gentrification.

 

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.