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Bob Mann says campaign-finance system is legalized bribery; why the delayed uproar over Common Core?

The ethics administration’s database and the secretary of state’s database are separate. There is no way to cross-reference information electronically on those sites. You can print out an Excel sheet on a candidate’s contributions and then go to the secretary of state’s site to look up corporations.

That needs to change.

A city-enforcement effort against T-shirt shops operating illegally in the French Quarter resulted in 17 shops being cited for non-compliance in recent months and being hauled before an administrative hearing officer this week.

In the first half of both this year and last, precisely the same number of shooting victims — 251 — arrived at the trauma center at Interim LSU Hospital. But the outcomes were different: Doctors lost 30 percent fewer of their gunshot victims this year.

Others point to a laundry list of other possibilities: dumb luck, an unexplained bout of bad marksmanship, a shift in the types of guns available on the streets, changes in the way the New Orleans Police Department categorizes its crimes.

I have a hard time believing that dumb luck or suddenly poor marksmanship is the explanation. I hope the media continues to scrutinize this odd statistical variance.

First and foremost, [Common Core] critics say, is the fact the overhaul is starting to show up in both public and Catholic schools’ homework assignments and all-important letter grades.

“It is a big shift because parents are starting to see it,” said Mary Kass, who lives in Gretna and opposes the new standards, which are called Common Core.

State education leaders are moving to calm political tempests over the Common Core State Standards by adopting or reaffirming policies aimed at asserting local control over data, curriculum, and materials. But the classroom-level impact of those moves could be negligible as states forge ahead on common-core implementation.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley blogs at Your Right Hand Thief. Until mid 2014, Mark Moseley was The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans.