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Arkansas oil spill exposes loophole related to Keystone XL; city spends big bucks to fight OPP consent decree

[Kleckley's] resistance reflects the governor’s political weakness. … “I think he was tired of being out on a limb,” said Vic Stelly, who served four terms in the state House from Lake Charles and knows Kleckley well. “I guess Chuck said enough is enough.”

Right now Jindal’s plan seems to be, at best, on life support. Perhaps the governor could use some of the talking points I suggested recently?

Embattled Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman testified in federal court today about a shocking video unearthed earlier this week depicting an out-of-control House of Detention in which inmates brazenly showed off drugs, cash, and a loaded Glock handgun.

Gusman’s testimony came as the city of New Orleans tries to convince U.S. District Court Judge Lance Africk to let it out from under a proposed consent decree at the Orleans Parish Prison. The city contends that the cost of compliance — about $22 million a year for half a decade — will cripple city services and tip the precarious public safety situation in New Orleans ever closer to anarchy.

The video, Gusman explained, had been in a safe within the jail’s Special Operations Division until the city, and then the FBI, demanded that he produce it.

The latest round in this slow-motion saga involves ten houses that were offered to private housing agencies along with more than $1 million in public money to renovate them. The houses had been relocated in 2010 but stood open to the elements when the request for proposals went out to the non-profit housing community this past November. The lucky winners were selected with unaccustomed speed. The results to date? Inconclusive.

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About Mark Moseley

Mark Moseley is The Lens' opinion writer, engagement specialist and coordinator for the Charter Schools Reporting Corps. He writes The Lens' daily news roundup. In 2004 he stopped yelling at his TV and began a New Orleans blog called Your Right Hand Thief. After Katrina and the Federal Flood he helped create the Rising Tide conference, which grew into an annual social media event dedicated to the future of New Orleans. He can be reached at (504) 481-5407.