Government & Politics
 

Monumental decision: Who should be honored in place of the Confederates?

The unveiling of the Robert E. Lee statue in 1884 was attended by Jefferson Davis and Gen. P.G.T Beauregard. The roundabout, here pictured in a period postcard, had previously been known as Tivoli Circle.

The unveiling of the Robert E. Lee statue in 1884 was attended by Jefferson Davis and Gen. P.G.T Beauregard. The roundabout, here pictured in a period postcard, had previously been known as Tivoli Circle.

I never would have guessed getting rid of the Confederate blemishes on our cityscape would become politically feasible — and so suddenly it’s almost a done deal! I’m elated.

Yes, my nostalgic sentimentalism gave me pause for about five seconds. I have many fond memories of Lee Circle, including swimming lessons at the old YMCA. And I always thought the statue of Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard at the entrance to City Park looked cool, mainly because of the excellent horse.

The greatest loss will be an end to the periodic defacement of Jefferson Davis with swastikas and other markings appropriate to the ideology he stood for. More than the others, the Jeff Davis monument, on the parkway that bears his name, seemed to inspire political expression by our intrepid local population of anarchist vandals.

There’s a petition going around on social media to save the place names and monuments, Lee Circle in particular. But I question how many of the signatories actually live in Orleans Parish. You might think Beauregard would be getting more defense than Lee, if only because he was from here. Indeed, it’s hard to think of an historical figure that has less to do with New Orleans than Robert E. Lee. But they all need to go. The only question is what to replace them with.

One historic marker up for removal doesn’t need a replacement. The Liberty Place monument, hidden behind the Canal Place parking garage for the past 20 years, could be tipped over and just tossed in the nearest dumpster. The diminutive obelisk should have been a monument to the victims of the 1874 coup, in which Crescent City White League thugs shot at the backs of an integrated New Orleans police force, but it glorified the coup plotters instead, so just throw it out.

Since Confederate sympathizers no longer have the guts to argue baldly for white supremacy, they now claim that the Confederacy was a part of “history” (like everything else) and should be enshrined in stone and bronze for that reason. I agree with them to this extent: the sites of the three statues commemorating leaders of the Confederacy should be replaced with figures from that time period or earlier.

I think we play into the arguments of Confederate sympathizers if we feel we have to replace these old statues with people from a more recent time. We can’t just turn our heads in horror over the whole saga of New Orleans prior to the day before yesterday, in some vain search for a conflict-free historical moment that will never exist.

I think we also need to avoid the easy, touristic solution of just putting famous jazz musicians on vacant pedestals. Armstrong Circle, in addition to Armstrong Airport and Armstrong Park, would definitely be overkill. New Orleans is a lot more than the home of one famous guy; we should have the courage to acknowledge more of our history than what’s safe and cuddly and good for tourism.

Here are my recommendations for what should replace the three existing Confederate monuments. I’ve also got a suggestion for another monument in a different location that’s long overdue.

The big opportunity is Lee Circle — keep the towering column, but let’s put someone else up there. Many people have made good suggestions. Almost any figure would be better than Lee, given how tenuous his connections are to New Orleans. It’s obvious that he always represented an imposed ideology with very little organic connection to the society of the city. We should replace him with somebody local, but also from the same era.

That said, I think we should resist the temptation to be on the politically safe side and replace all of these monuments to white men with monuments to black people. The city needs to do more to honor its black leaders, but that doesn’t have to mean a ban on statues of white people.

How about a white New Orleanian of roughly Lee’s generation who stood for a more inclusive society than Lee did (when he wore the uniform he wears on the column). Since Lee Circle is in the American Quarter of the city, it would be even better to get somebody with ties to that neighborhood.

The Lee monument was dedicated in 1884, a dark time in New Orleans for local people — white or black — who envisioned the more inclusive society that had been attempted during Reconstruction. One prominent and nationally successful local writer spoke up: George Washington Cable.

Cable had already written a novel sharply critical of the slaveholding society that the Confederate monument builders were beginning to twist into some fairytale golden age. In 1884 Cable started going around on the lecture circuit — a mass medium of the day — delivering an oration called “The Freedman’s Case in Equity.” The speech excoriated efforts to erode black rights that were spreading across the South.

After vituperative attacks in the Southern press, followed by death threats, Cable was forced to leave his hometown for good — in the same year New Orleans adorned Lee Circle with its monument to some guy from Virginia who led the war for white supremacy (even though he, too, had later supported Reconstruction).

If we include Armstrong Park, Musical Legends Park, and numerous other locations, how many monuments to musicians do we already have in New Orleans? And how many monuments to writers? A bronze Edgar Allan Poe presides in Baltimore. Shouldn’t we celebrate our literary heritage as well as our music?

Through today’s sophisticated anti-racist lens, we can see numerous flaws in Cable’s literary effort to promote racial equality. Like his buddy Mark Twain, he briefly served in the Confederate military — but so did Afro-Creole writer and activist Armand Lanusse. Subjecting people of the past to contemporary litmus tests about what language they used and what uniform they may have worn, for whatever reason and however briefly, is historical illiteracy.

What we need to do is gauge the courage and vision of the stands people took in their own times. Cable’s stand for racial equality got him run out of town. I like the sound of “Cable Circle.” Bring the man back home. Put Cable on the column.

I suspect that Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s administration would rather see new monuments that could be better marketed to tourists. Cable Circle would be much more of a head-scratcher than Lee Circle or Armstrong Circle, but the monument isn’t a great selfie-op in any case, given how high its column lifts the statue above the street.

My next recommendation would be a tour guide’s delight, though she’s mistakenly been omitted from the city’s official commemoration of great New Orleanians: Marie Laveau, the voodoo queen. She should have a statue and it would do double duty for her daughter and namesake. Bayou St. John is the right place for a Laveau statue, since that’s where mother and daughter held their St. John’s Eve celebrations until they moved them closer to the lake. That makes them the perfect replacement for Beauregard.

The substitution is sure to be a big hit with the tourists, but with locals as well. The elder Laveau was revered by New Orleanians of different races and social classes at the time of her death in 1881. I would depict her seated magisterially, with daughter Marie, who assumed her mantle, standing behind with a mischievous gleam in her eye—since she was more of a disruptive trickster than her mother. Both should be scaled a bit larger than life, as befits their legends.

My idea about what to do with Jefferson Davis Parkway and the monument to Davis at its Canal Street crossing is influenced by what stands on the parkway neutral ground at Banks Street: a monument to Cuban independence hero, José Martí.

At a time of renewed Hispanic migration into New Orleans, and of renewed ties with Cuba, rededication of this picturesque boulevard provides a unique opportunity to salute our Spanish heritage. I like the series of statues on Basin Street commemorating Latin American revolutionaries, but people have been grousing about wanting to re-locate the Simon Bolivar statue for a long time. So why not move it to the parkway? He could anchor the parkway at Tulane Avenue (where a lesser Confederate now has his bust); and iconic Mexican President Benito Juárez could anchor the other end at the new Lafitte Greenway.

Latinos are abundant in the Mid-City area, and deserve an official nod from the city about the contribution of the Spanish colonial period to the city’s history. Streets named for the Spanish governors (Miró, Gálvez, etc) are also close by.

More to the point, remembering the Spanish period is especially useful as a way to distance New Orleans from the South represented by Lee and Davis and Beauregard. One of the most exceptional aspects of New Orleans when it entered the United States in 1803 was the city’s high proportion of free blacks. It was the Spanish who made it so, by allowing numerous avenues to freedom for slaves, opportunities that the Americans would quickly block.

Indeed, the day in 1803 after the formal parade celebrating the Louisiana Purchase, a parade that included two militias of free blacks, Gen. James Wilkinson, an alarmed aide to Gov. William Claiborne, sought additional American troops from Washington, warning that the “formidable aspect of the armed Blacks & Malattoes (sic) … is painful and perplexing.”

The French Quarter features a very prominent monument to Jean Baptiste LeMoyne, Sieur de Bienville, the French founder and four-time colonial-era governor; now it’s time to recognize a Spanish-era governor. I propose that the Davis statue be replaced by one honoring Bernardo de Gálvez, the man also remembered in the names of St. Bernard Avenue and St. Bernard Parish. Among Gálvez’s many accomplishments is the capture of the British garrisons at Mobile and Pensacola in support of the American Revolution. That’s right, Gálvez is the only Louisiana governor to have attacked Alabama — and won! That should be reason enough for a monument.

Carl Sandburg’s famous poem, “Chicago,” celebrates that city of “building, breaking, re-building,” but that’s not us. The New Orleans way is not to ignore everything that happened more than five minutes ago, but to agonize over our history in a search for ghosts more amenable to the values we hold dear.

This is not an impossible task. One figure from the past — a figure more deserving of our collective reverence and grief than any other — has been ignored to date. Atoning for that neglect provides an opportunity far greater, and also different in kind, from simply swapping a fresh statue for that of a figure who has been disgraced.

We need a memorial to the people who built the city and its wealth, notwithstanding the life of terror forced upon them. We need a memorial to the victims of slavery.

There is John Scott’s beautiful “Spirit House” at the corner of Gentilly Boulevard and St. Bernard Avenue, and it should remain there. But a prominent location should be chosen for a more monumental statement.

The riverfront has an immigrant memorial and a Holocaust memorial, both of which are fine with me — until I reflect on the absence of a memorial to the holocaust of unwilling immigrants. Enslaved Africans were more responsible than anyone else for building the city we now hold dear, and for enriching the jerks who put up the Confederate memorials that we finally have the courage to tear down.

Spanish Plaza, currently in flux, is the perfect place for a “Tomb of the Unknown Slave.” People can reflect on it when they buy their outlet mall consumer goods, and it can be a terminus for numerous processionals and political demonstrations.

The river is the natural spot for the immigrant memorial, since that’s where my Irish ancestors and many others disembarked with hope and a dream. The slave memorial needs to be on the old riverfront, too, since that’s where they were hustled off in chains to build a great city that would then struggle to forget them — until now. What happens at this newly hallowed public space will be more important than any other public monument in the city, old or new.

C.W. Cannon’s latest novel is “Katrina Means Cleansing,” a young adult book about Hurricane Katrina for middle-school readers. He teaches writing and New Orleans Studies at Loyola University.

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  • I like the idea of the Latino Parkway- Galvez, Marti and Bolivar being together there is a good idea. I also like the idea of a statue devoted to remembering those enslaved-maybe it can resemble the Monument to the Immigrant in Woldenberg Park. As for Beauregard statue, I’d prefer one of Isaac Delgado there or another philanthropist like Touro or maybe a Ida Kohlmeyer or an Enrique Alferez sculpture there. Marie L should be in the Quarter, possibly Saint Ann at Rampart once the streetcar mess is over and doesn’t need to be a statue but can be a contemplative site describing both Maries’ activities and skills…I’d also like some non-heroic statuary in places like Lee Circle: maybe that can be a 4-sided timeline of the 4 flags that have flown over New Orleans: French, Spanish, Confederate and American with the text describing these eras. The flags don’t have to be there and the secession era can be appropriately described with some tact. Or it a park with green space and a fountain…Or representation of the writers, artists musicians who helped rescue New Orleans in the 20th century from being remembered only as devoted to the mythical “Lost Cause.” and finally, when people talk about “erasing” history or assigning political correctness to the desire to remove Confederate generals from prominent spaces, my reply is that of course the history remains; it’s just that it is time to replace those with some that honor those who have built a better city and to remove symbols from public spaces and buildings that remind us all of a shameful history and a great divide.

  • nickelndime

    Yeah, I would question how many of the “signatories” live in Orleans Parish too. Now, why do you (collectively speaking) think “they” don’t live in Orleans Parish —- anymore?
    07/21/2015 7:05 PM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    “Art mimics real life.” In the movies, “The Statue of Liberty” gets torn up, gets buried,…
    WE think that Mitch da Mayor is being divisive. WE don’t think Mitch believes in “anything.” He is like LaToya with an un-lit cigarette – standing in front of a bar.
    When Entergy tears the streets up in New Orleans, “upgrading,” put a couple of monuments on the list. Who cares? (Perhaps the non-resident signatories)

    The people who are here in this city now – they do not appear to care – oh! my bad! that’s right – the obvious!
    “NEW ORLEANS – THE CITY THAT CARE FORGOT” OR IS IT really, “THE CITY THAT FORGOT TO CARE” !?
    07/22/2015 4:06 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    The actual quote is, “Art imitates life.” ASP made me do it. He dared me. You can just imagine that conversation in The Garden of Eden. Well, WE (ASP and I) know that Gawd knew exactly what was going to happen sending The Snake in…”Everybody knows the dice are loaded…” Blame the humans. They have free will. LMAspO! WE are not exonerating any of you – if any of you were in that Garden, you would have (expletive deleted) up too.
    07/22/2015 4:52 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    Hence, the title of the movie, “Imitation of Life.”
    “ART” – HUMANS AT WORK
    07/22/2015 4:59 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    WE are not talking Latino or Latina – WE are talking Picasso.
    07/22/2015 5:06 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    “I am ‘The Man from La Mancha” – What a life! What a story! Poverty – military – poet – Spaniard.
    07/22/2015 5:27 AM DST USA

  • Tim

    Dear nickelndime,

    I’m trying very hard to understand and appreciate your comments, but I’m just not getting it. It’s just too Dada and too many posts to process. You may want to focus on posting just one comment per article per day and allow others to comment before you return. It seems to me that you are in 1st place when it comes to quantity of comments, but you are in absolute last place when it comes to quality of comments. Just a friendly suggestion.

    Peace,

    Tim

  • nickelndime

    That is perfectly okay, “Tim.” WE (ASP and I) wish that more people would post “something” – “anything,” 4gawdsake! And you did, so good for you.

    BTW, WE don’t understand (IT’S HOW TURN TO “NOT UNDERSTAND”) how others’ posting comments or commentaries affects whether other readers post or not. It all adds up.

    WE think that C. W. Cannon did a great job in expressing his opinion and writing the article. What WE don’t understand is why there are not more comments by readers.

    Quite simply, if a “title” or a “writer” catches your (generally speaking) attention, read it and make a comment or two or three…
    LMAspO! …or four! WE do, and WE get a kick out of it.
    07/23/2015 7:01 PM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    “BY INVITATION ONLY” – WELL LOOK AT YOU, STEVE BEATTY of THE LENS!
    Way to go! Just when ASP was yawning and thinking nothing was going on in the city.
    07/23/20 11:20 PM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    Mitch says, “Everybody FOCUS on monuments.” Last month, the “focus” was on second-hand smoke (coff coff).
    Thank you, LaToya for your contribution to last month’s agenda – and the minutes.
    PAUSE.
    (Forget about everything else – i.e., a crumbling infrastructure). But Mitch is not alone. He is just like all the other urban mayors. Mitch can’t change. His malady is that he’s generic – I mean, “genetic.” Look at Mary, his elder sister. Well, okay, Mary may be an outlier in the Landrieu clan. Oh hell, she ain’t. FOCUS!
    07/26/2015 1:23 AM DST USA

  • Confederate Cash

    Its wonderful to see the well spring of support from the entire community, state and Nation in preserving our city’s history and culture.
    Even local publication the tribune agrees with leaving the statues alone.

    Http//www.tribunetalk.com/?slider=we-got-99-problems-and-lee-circle-aint-one

    Ive not heard one,not one cogent argument to legitimize their removal. Not from Landrieu not the city council…no one!
    Your apparent reasoning for removing the Confederate statues among other bizzare reasons weve heard, is that the signers of the petition arent from here or dont live here…thats pure hogwash for several reasons.

    It will be a beautiful day in New Orleans when this witch hunt is quashed and ridiculed for the grandstanding, divisive and deflection that it is.
    Then we can get onto the real issues that plague our fair city.

  • nickelndime

    Hear! Hear! Statues and second-hand smoke – stir it up, Mitch. If the mayor and the City Council cannot ensure the completion of anything in this city, then they will do what they do best – incite the residents.
    07/27/2015 1:31 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    New Orleans isn’t like any other city on Planet Earth – Thank Gawd of the 7th Ward and the Gawds of all the other wards in this city – St. Claude have mercy! Quick, get us a book bag! WE feel a “blessing” coming on. BTW – who is the “patron saint” of book bags?

    New Orleans is known around the world – and not just because of Mardi Gras. How is it that New Orleans gets stuck with so many bad politicians – like Mitch Landrieu, et al.? Bottom-of
    -the barrel, low-life feeders who make money off of the poor!

    Mitch, please get in the limo with Walt Leger, III. WE (ASP and I) promise that the gate to the St. Roch Cemetery is open and there is a press conference going on in there – right now. WE hope you can make it, Boyz – z -z!
    LMAspO! 0727/2015 1:49 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    WE would like to know why in the hell a stop light was installed at Bienville and Basin. Was it before or after the shooting? Well, nevermind! This is so totally uncalled for. ASP (that’s my pet snake ASP) and his little mesh school bag were smashed up bad against the windshield when “nickelndime” had to pull the handbrake on the RV.
    07/27/2015 1:58 AM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    Reilly Co. (in the shrimp-colored 300 building on North Rampart) has moved to Harahan. There will be a “something” on that square block – and you can bet that this “deal” (yet another one) was done way before the “deal” was made for the streetcar tracks.
    Don’t you see – it’s way bigger than a city.
    07/27/2015 4:07 AM DST USA

  • Chris

    Designed to last for All…

    A Transformative Vision at Lee Circle: “The National Reconciliation Monument”

    The entire American experience is re-examined under the guidance of the Liberian palava hut. The call for peace and reconcilliation is spent spacially upwards into the heavens as the ever eternal lighted flame of peace is never vanquished… Can we re-frame Lee Circle and leave the General rightly on site? Repurposing the older elements in new directions…Nobody denies that reconciliation is tantamount as a sentiment for all. The palava/peace hut is a traditional building that has been part of Liberian culture for many generations. Although these huts can still be seen around the countryside, during their civil war its significance was lost and its presence ignored even though everyone knows its purpose is to serve as a place to resolve conflict and come together in peace.

    The huts draw upon a generations-old means to reconcile the wounds of war and solve conflicts independently of the courts. These structures are literally open to all sides equally and provide a neutral meeting place where members of a community can hear and impart justice. In this context, the win-lose rulings of corrupt courts can transform into win-win solutions for many civil disputes. General Lee empowered his freed slaves to return back to Liberia and this symbolic transfusion is coming home as a metaphorical gift of peace being replanted back on our American states.- Unity for all. – The winged chalice are the sentiments of Peace lofting into the heavens suggesting an eternal desire to cover the atmosphere with the hopes that we can enjoy tranquility with collaborative effort to invoke reconciliation for all.

    What I do see… after the concept of a “National Reconciliation Monument” becomes the agenda is a group process to flesh out many items… hopefully, there will be more of an open process moving forward and I envision this propasal as “design by committee.” Somehow after reading more into the history about General Lee I gained respect for what he wanted and what his philosophy although he was not as successful in his attempt to reconcile the ills of the Civil War. As an ode to him… I encapsulated his effort in adopting the palava/peace hut as an idea. In the design.. somehow Lee is not to be discarded but maybe introduced elsewhere at the site under the umbrella of tolerance the hut calls for as he attempts to negotiate our history with other figures and ideals that we all cherish. Lincoln… a ‘ethnic maroons’… a Native American… the immigrants…Jews, Catholics and Muslums, Gentiles – they ALL need to be considered and made relevant. And I don’t plan to entertain that his figure be auctioned off to be a decorative element in somebody’s backyard. My sadness would be relieved if we could give the General his props and bury him in style with a 21st Century Jazz Funeral – send his soul to Metarie Cemetery with with all his proper credentials reclaimed and rededicated. Full honors! We don’t rename the street to anything but Lee Circle. It will always be Lee Circle… The past is now present! Justice, Freedom and Liberty doesn’t have any time limits for Reconciliation.

    The Core Values of Rconciliation:

    Value the dignity of every individual and are steadfastly committed to social and economic justice. Equality of and access to opportunity for all persons must be a fundamental right in all societies. Respectful relationships are the key to trust, healing and reconciliation in our communities.

    Dignity:

    Each human being has an innate right to respect and ethical treatment.

    Justice:

    Restorative and retributive strategies, approaches and techniques which address and repair the consequences of discrimination based on difference.

    Healing:

    Restoring an individual to spiritual wholeness as well as repairing rifts between persons and cultures.

    Reconciliation:

    Recognition and acknowledgement that, despite our differences, we need each other and must learn to work together and respect, forgive and love each other.

    Self-Determination:

    Affirmation of our power to create, name and define ourselves instead of allowing others to do that for us.

    Wholeness:

    Acting authentically by aligning our beliefs and our behaviors; making a healthy whole of ourselves and our world.

    Trust:

    Reliance on the integrity, strength, ability, and surety of a person or organization.

    Relationships:

    Connections in which individuals influence each other, share their thoughts and feelings, and engage in activities together. Because of this interdependence, most things that change or impact one member of the relationship will affect the other member.

    Equity:

    An agreed-upon system of processes and mechanisms ensuring that all people are treated with fairness and dignity by establishing ceilings on profits and an economic base below which human beings are not allowed to fall.

    Community:

    Community consists of people connected and interacting through common bonds of shared place (community of place) and/or shared interest (community of interest). We pursue the community ideal of social interaction, organizations, and institutions built on the bases of mutual respect, compassion, security, strength, support, empowerment, innovation, justice, and sustainability.

    Respect:

    A positive feeling of esteem for a person coupled with specific actions and conduct reflective of that esteem.

    Honesty:

    Responsibility for transparency and integrityhttps://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155813783560621&set=a.10150242401005621.486474.852175620&type=1&theater

  • Chris

    Designed to last for All…

    A Transformative Vision at Lee Circle: “The National Reconciliation Monument”

    The entire American experience is re-examined under the guidance of the Liberian palava hut. The call for peace and reconcilliation is spent spacially upwards into the heavens as the ever eternal lighted flame of peace is never vanquished… Can we re-frame Lee Circle and leave the General rightly on site? Repurposing the older elements in new directions…Nobody denies that reconciliation is tantamount as a sentiment for all. The palava/peace hut is a traditional building that has been part of Liberian culture for many generations. Although these huts can still be seen around the countryside, during their civil war its significance was lost and its presence ignored even though everyone knows its purpose is to serve as a place to resolve conflict and come together in peace.

    The huts draw upon a generations-old means to reconcile the wounds of war and solve conflicts independently of the courts. These structures are literally open to all sides equally and provide a neutral meeting place where members of a community can hear and impart justice. In this context, the win-lose rulings of corrupt courts can transform into win-win solutions for many civil disputes. General Lee empowered his freed slaves to return back to Liberia and this symbolic transfusion is coming home as a metaphorical gift of peace being replanted back on our American states.- Unity for all. – The winged chalice are the sentiments of Peace lofting into the heavens suggesting an eternal desire to cover the atmosphere with the hopes that we can enjoy tranquility with collaborative effort to invoke reconciliation for all.

    What I do see… after the concept of a “National Reconciliation Monument” becomes the agenda is a group process to flesh out many items… hopefully, there will be more of an open process moving forward and I envision this propasal as “design by committee.” Somehow after reading more into the history about General Lee I gained respect for what he wanted and what his philosophy although he was not as successful in his attempt to reconcile the ills of the Civil War. As an ode to him… I encapsulated his effort in adopting the palava/peace hut as an idea. In the design.. somehow Lee is not to be discarded but maybe introduced elsewhere at the site under the umbrella of tolerance the hut calls for as he attempts to negotiate our history with other figures and ideals that we all cherish. Lincoln… a ‘ethnic maroons’… a Native American… the immigrants…Jews, Catholics and Muslums, Gentiles – they ALL need to be considered and made relevant. And I don’t plan to entertain that his figure be auctioned off to be a decorative element in somebody’s backyard. My sadness would be relieved if we could give the General his props and bury him in style with a 21st Century Jazz Funeral – send his soul to Metarie Cemetery with with all his proper credentials reclaimed and rededicated. Full honors! We don’t rename the street to anything but Lee Circle. It will always be Lee Circle… The past is now present! Justice, Freedom and Liberty doesn’t have any time limits for Reconciliation.

    The Core Values of Rconciliation:

    Value the dignity of every individual and are steadfastly committed to social and economic justice. Equality of and access to opportunity for all persons must be a fundamental right in all societies. Respectful relationships are the key to trust, healing and reconciliation in our communities.

    Dignity:

    Each human being has an innate right to respect and ethical treatment.

    Justice:

    Restorative and retributive strategies, approaches and techniques which address and repair the consequences of discrimination based on difference.

    Healing:

    Restoring an individual to spiritual wholeness as well as repairing rifts between persons and cultures.

    Reconciliation:

    Recognition and acknowledgement that, despite our differences, we need each other and must learn to work together and respect, forgive and love each other.

    Self-Determination:

    Affirmation of our power to create, name and define ourselves instead of allowing others to do that for us.

    Wholeness:

    Acting authentically by aligning our beliefs and our behaviors; making a healthy whole of ourselves and our world.

    Trust:

    Reliance on the integrity, strength, ability, and surety of a person or organization.

    Relationships:

    Connections in which individuals influence each other, share their thoughts and feelings, and engage in activities together. Because of this interdependence, most things that change or impact one member of the relationship will affect the other member.

    Equity:

    An agreed-upon system of processes and mechanisms ensuring that all people are treated with fairness and dignity by establishing ceilings on profits and an economic base below which human beings are not allowed to fall.

    Community:

    Community consists of people connected and interacting through common bonds of shared place (community of place) and/or shared interest (community of interest). We pursue the community ideal of social interaction, organizations, and institutions built on the bases of mutual respect, compassion, security, strength, support, empowerment, innovation, justice, and sustainability.

    Respect:

    A positive feeling of esteem for a person coupled with specific actions and conduct reflective of that esteem.

    Honesty:

    Responsibility for transparency and integrity

  • blueshead swampy

    Jeez.. the logical choice is Ignatius J. Reilly. For each and every Confederate Statue in the City of New

    Orleans..

    And the Joan of Arc Statue in the French Quarter should be replaced by Myrna Minkoff in her Volkswagon as she rescues Ignatius and pulls him out of this shit hole and up to New York.. 🙂

  • nickelndime

    “blueshead swampy” might be on to something. ONE statue – just use different poses. Hold up! If Mitch actually gets this to fly – who in gawd’s name will be the “artist” commissioned to “create” the new statuary collection? Somebody will be making a lot of money. Hold up again! If Mitch likes “group think” (which he apparently does), maybe he could commission five (5) artists to work on each statue. Isn’t that the way city government and the “departments” work? It takes a whole crew to fix a light – one to hold the map, one to hold the light – one to…
    08/03/2015 7:14 PM DST USA

  • nickelndime

    “Pride cometh b4 the fall.” (and
    WE are not talking about the SEASONS).? Understand? 08/05/2015 DST USA

  • nickelndime

    Working in a team configuration
    Is cumbersome (ask Donald Trump). 08/04/2025
    4:30
    AM DST USA