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Decision nears on high-cost modular buildings, with some board members questioning need

Debate continued at the International School of Louisiana’s monthly board meeting, Feb. 29, over whether to sign a five-year lease on several modular buildings for use on the school’s Olivier and Camp Street campuses. The leases would cost roughly $340,000 per building.

Some board members questioned enrollment projections presented by head of schools Sean Wilson and wondered if there is immediate need for the extra space. But board members also were compelled by the argument that crowding on the Camp Street campus already has led to sacrifice of the school’s computer lab and art room. The deadline to rent the modulars is March 20.

ISL still has no contract and no school building for its Jefferson Parish charter. But the board was encouraged by the response from residents.  Pam Stewart, director of development, reported that the would-be school already has twice as many applications as the West Bank campus did at this point in its formation.

In other business, the board unanimously authorized pursuing a low-interest loan of $100,000 for unspecified supplies. ISL would have three years to pay back the no-interest loan.

The board also accepted the state’s attestation that its 2011-12 audit is in good order.

No decision was made on whether to alternate board meetings between the two Orleans Parish campuses, a move that would provide easier access for Algiers parents. Board president Andrew Yon suggested meeting at Olivier Street at least once a quarter. A decision will be made at the next meeting.

The board then went into executive session to discuss whether to renew Wilson’s contract as head of schools.

Present at the meeting in addition to Yon and Wilson were vice president Matt Amoss, treasurer Charlie Hadley, secretary Barbara Griffin and members Mike Lappa and David Bordson-Bozzo.

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