Squandered Heritage Vintage
 

622-24 Deslonde Street {Holy Cross}

The following properties in your neighborhood will be considered at the
March 9 Historic District Landmarks Commission hearing. The March 9 hearing
begins at 9:30 a.m. and is held in City Council Chambers, First Floor, City
Hall, 1300 Perdido St. The meeting is open to the public.

RESULT: May 11th, 2007 : Approved
RESULT: Deferred 30 days to allowapplicant to work with neighborhood association on alternatives to demolition April 20th agenda was too long to review, deferred again to May 11th, 2007.

622-24 Deslonde St.: DEMOLITION OF BUILDING for a parking lot. Paulette
Guerra, owner. Adolph Klundt, applicant.

622-24 Deslonde Street

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About Karen Gadbois

Karen Gadbois co-founded The Lens. She now covers New Orleans government issues and writes about land use for Squandered Heritage. For her work with television reporter Lee Zurik exposing widespread misuse of city recovery funds — which led to guilty pleas in federal court — Gadbois won some of the highest honors in journalism, including a Peabody Award, an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award and a gold medal from Investigative Reporters and Editors. She can be reached at (504) 606-6013.

  • Paulette Guerra

    The purpose is NOT for a parking lot, but for off-street parking for the house next door at 626 Deslonde. The house is not to be demolished but deconstructed. The materials will be used to make repairs from Katrina damage on 626 and 632 Deslonde. Remaining materials will be distributed to other owners needing materials in the Holy Cross neighborhood.

  • Randall

    The owner of the 622-24 Deslonde street, Ms. Guerra, said “The purpose is NOT for a parking lot, but for off-street parking for the house next door at 626 Deslonde. The house is not to be demolished but deconstructed. The materials will be used to make repairs from Katrina damage on 626 and 632 Deslonde. Remaining materials will be distributed to other owners needing materials in the Holy Cross neighborhood”.

    For anyone to view 626 and 632 deslondes street copy and paste the following:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/61434714@N00/467452871/
    and
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/61434714@N00/467439304/in/photostream/

    As the whole deconstruction thing goes, 626 and 632 Deslonde have very little exterior damage, they even appear to have new roofs, so maybe the owner is thinking about using the materials for interior work. How many stable, homes in semi-decent condition like 622-24 Deslonde will be deconstructed before we realize that there are so many materials we don’t know what to do with them. The materials will probably be used as organs to help keep those Uptown houses looking their best for the next couple of decades.

    What is your definition of a parking lot Mrs guerra. Well, The American Heritage Dictionary’s definition of a parking lot is “n. An area for parking motor vehicles”. What is the difference between a parking lot and “off street parking for the house next door”, isn’t off street parking an area for parking motor vehicles? There is a vacant lot next to 632 Deslonde Street so maybe that is “off street parking” also. One of the sacrifices that people make to live a historic area is there is virtually no “off street parking” because if there was then the neighborhood would resemble a modern suburb. If every one in a historic neighborhood wanted “off street parking” there would be a huge problem because there would be so many demolitions. Besides, there are barley any cars on any street in the Holy Cross neighborhood anyway, so I don’t understand the need for “off street parking”.

  • P. Guerra

    Randall, maybe it would make more sense if I called it a side yard with space for trees and plants. A place for kids to play instead of being on the street. And although the streets are not congested now, they were prior to Katrina. Unfortunately, most of our neighbors have not returned. You are entitled to your opinion, although you are not one of our neighbors and don’t live on our street. If you did, you would know that we’ve been there since 1986 and have been good stewarts of the Holy Cross neighborhood. We’ve taken very good care of our home and meticiously renovated, always taking care of historical artifacts. After Katrina, we gutted the interiors ourselves as to ensure nothing historical was thrown away by volunteers. It is my belief that neighborhoods do want to expand green space – just like Global Green is doing in the Holy Cross neighborhood. And just like Mayor Nagin is recommending that property owners next to blighted property be allowed to extend their green space.

  • Larry Smith

    I have known Adolph Klundt for 38 of his 66 years. He was my neighbor in Austin, TX. I now live in Opelika, AL. I have visited the home Adolph and Paulette renovated at 632 Deslonde. It is a wonderful home. I have seen before and after pictures. Adolph is a craftsman. He is a accomplished artist. As a retired architect, and knowing Adolph so well, I can visualize what he and Paulette are tying to accmplish. I can visualize what a side yard would look like. With Adolph’s skills, it would look like a small green park. It sounds like what you have in Holy Coss is a “Hysterical Society”, not a Historical Society. I live in a 100 year home in a “Historical District” here in Opelika.We have our own “Hysterical Socity” Many of these old homes were built w/o parking or garages requiring cars to be parked street side which does create street congestion. I too have worked my butt off on my old house. I am now 75 years old and don’t have a lot of butt left. And, at 66, Adolph “ain’t no” spring chicken either. 622 Deslonde looks pretty ragged out to me. There comes a time in the life of a structure, as with humans when it it time to leave this earth. I think it is time for 622 to be put to rest.